Online catalogue / Ruth Beckermann :

The Dreamed Ones
Die Geträumten
AT / 2016
89 min.

short synopsis:
The themes of love and hate are depicted in the movie. At center stage are the two poets Ingeborg Bachmann and Paul Celan, who came to know each other in post-war Vienna. Their vivid postal exchange creates the textual basis of the film. Two young actors, Anja Plaschg and Laurence Rupp, meet in a recording studio to read the letters. The tumultuous emotions of proximity and distance, fascination and fear captivate them. However they also enjoy each other’s company, arguing, smoking, discussing their tattoos and favourite music. Yesterday’s love, today’s love and tomorrow’s: where the lines are blurred lies the heart of the film.

long synopsis:
The themes of love and hate are depicted in the movie. At center stage are the two poets Ingeborg Bachmann and Paul Celan, who came to know each other in post‐war Vienna. Their vivid postal exchange creates the textual basis of the film.

The dramatic, ecstatic, but also infinitely sad love story between Bachmann and Celan begins in 1948 when she is 22 and he is 27. It ends with the suicide of Celan in Paris in 1971. For Bachmann, he is the love of her life, however she never stops seeing him as a stranger and even harbours slight fears towards him. He was a Jew from Czernowitz,
whose parents perished in the Holocaust while she came from a milieu of National Socialism. Growing up in Carinthia, Bachmann witnessed little of the war and persecution. Love and friendship, but also doubts and disruptions permeate their lifelong relationship and in a moment of doubt Bachmann asks: "Are we only the dreamed ones?".

Two young actors, Anja Plaschg and Laurence Rupp, meet in a recording studio to read the letters. The tumultuous emotions of proximity and distance, fascination and fear captivate them. However they also enjoy each other´s company, arguing, smoking, discussing their tattoos and favourite music. Yesterday´s love, today´s love and tomorrow´s: where the lines are blurred lies the heart of the film. (production note)


The vast majority of the running time of The Dreamed Ones consists of two actors in a studio, engaging in a readers´ theatre performance of the correspondence between Romanian poet Paul Celan and his longtime friend and lover, Austrian poet / novelist Ingeborg Bachmann. The performers, Anja Plaschg and Laurence Rupp, read the letters from their handheld manuscripts and speak them directly into studio microphones, one after the other. It is as if Beckermann is filming a documentary about the making of an audiobook. But this doesn´t give a precise sense of the experience of watching The Dreamed Ones. With their low-key delivery, Plaschg and Rupp carefully bring out the tension and anguish in the letters. There are numerous complications in the Celan / Bachmann relationship: professional jealousy that Celan felt at Bachmann´s successes; the unspoken gulf of their disparate experiences of the war years; and Celan´s ongoing sense of being an outsider in an anti-Semitic Europe, something he knows Bachmann cannot truly understand. And yet, apart from these crises, which are highly specific to this particular couple and their position within the postwar modernist literary intelligentsia, Beckermann helps us to feel just as acutely those infelicities that are fundamental to all star-crossed lovers. Bachmann knows Celan will not leave his wife and child; Celan knows she is too ethical to demand that he do so.
In the midst of the performance sequences, Beckermann shows us Rupp and Plaschg on break, rolling cigarettes, chatting idly about their work, discussing their own relationships, and gradually disabusing the notion that a conventional film would take as an axiom. The performers are cordial acquaintances, possibly friends, but pointedly not lovers, and their real-life relationship does not mirror the fictional one they are portraying as performers. The Dreamed Ones sits at the junction of several strains of experimental film practice. The film bears a surface-level resemblance to the cinema of Straub-Huillet, but Beckermann´s direction, camerawork, and editing are slier and more agile, given to punctuation rather than the wide-open expanse of a blank page. In its making-of element, there is also a hint of Harun Farocki´s influence, examining art´s components coming together through visible labor. But above all, Beckermann is showing us how two performers can engage in a kind of fencing match through the epistolary record of a stunted, complicated love affair. (Michael Sicinski. mubi notebook. 20th Sep 2016)

Link: https://mubi.com/notebook/posts/tiff-2016-wavelengths-features

A film by:
- Ruth Beckermann

category:
- not specified

original language:
- german

Available Prints:
- DCP 2K

order

rental conditions

more on Austrian Independent Film & Video Database:
- Credits
- Festival placements
- Texte und Bilder
- Biographie: Ruth Beckermann